A Look at the Bigger Picture

Every year when we release our Progress Report, I am amazed at how much the SFI program and its many partners have achieved.

Here are just a few of the highlights from this year’s report:

  • 5,584 resource and logging professionals trained in 2010;
  • $81.4 million invested by program participants in forest research activities in 2010;
  • 948 SFI Implementation Committee members;
  • 36% increase in chain-of-custody certified locations from the start of 2010 to April 2011;
  • SFI commitment of $1.1 million through its Conservation and Community Partnerships Grant Program in 2010 and 2011 – a total value of $4.2 million once partner contributions are included;
  • more than five million acres/two million hectares of lands held or managed by Aboriginal communities certified to the SFI 2010-2014 Standard;
  • new SFI on-product labels to strengthen transparency.

It’s obvious why the title of our Progress Report is The Bigger Picture: Conservation. Community. Integrity.

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For SFI Inc., a rigorous certification standard is a starting point – it anchors an independent program broader than any other third-party forest certification program in North America; one that supports conservation research, reaches out to communities, and is built on integrity.

SFI Inc. Board Chair Bob Luoto put it well in his message: “. . . what impresses me most about the program is the fact that literally thousands of people across North America are putting it to work . . .”

We invited certification bodies who conduct the detailed third-party audits to the SFI standard to submit comments. Mike Ferruci of NSF-ISAR Forestry Program spoke to the SFI program rigor: “My advice for companies that want to be SFI certified is to make sure everything is in order before I arrive. I have no choice – if the SFI standard requirements are not being met, and I see a major non-conformance, I won’t be issuing an SFI certificate.”

SFI stands with other certification programs as a respected, internationally recognized standard. It also stands alone. It is the only program in North America requiring that program participants support and engage in research activities, that they broaden the practice of sustainable forestry through landowner and public outreach. It stands alone as the only program with a grassroots network of SFI Implementation Committees who train loggers and participate in important community events.

Conservation. Integrity. Community. All important parts of the SFI bigger picture as we work together to ensure our forests continue to offer the many values we treasure to our children, and to their children.

Read the full report here

Read our news release here

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